Episode Eighty-Eight: Selling Your Film

October 12, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

Many people have lofty dreams of making their own film “masterpiece”. It’s a nobel pursuit to throw caution to the wind, forget all the naysayers, and make your movie the way you want to do it. That is of course unless you have investors that are expecting to be paid back. Join us as we talk to ex-sales agent and founder of The Film Collaborative, Orly Ravid, to hear about her experience that led her to create this fabulous organization whose tag line is “Filmmakers First”.

Orly Ravid- Founder of The Film Collaborative (TFC)

Orly is a 12-year industry veteran whose experience in film ranges from festival programming to acquisitions &  domestic licensing and distribution, as well as business affairs, foreign sales, and digital distribution. In 1998, Orly joined veteran boutique foreign sales company Amazing Movies & Highland Crest Pictures and launched the company’s Art House domestic distribution label.

Orly then joined Maxmedia, producers of Chen Kaige’s Cannes Selection Emperor and the Assassin and the Miramax/Dimension release The Others starring Nicole Kidman. At Maxmedia Ravid worked in production and development and created FilmFixx, the company’s domestic distribution arm that launched with the highly controversial film Baise Moi. Orly subsequently consulted for various independent distributors and filmmakers under her own label, Ravid Film Consulting. In 2004 Orly launched Wolfe Releasing’s foreign sales, theatrical, and digital distribution arms and handled its acquisitions and business affairs.

In 2010 Orly founded The Film Collaborative (TFC), the first non-profit organization devoted to the distribution-education and the distribution of art house and documentary cinema. The Film Collaborative since its launch has worked with over 100 filmmakers.  It has consulted on distribution for films such as Sundance Winners GasLand and Contracorriente (Undertow), Revenge of the Electric Car (Tribeca), SXSW Winner Weekend, to name just a few.  TFC specializes in splitting rights and helping filmmakers navigate digital distribution, and it created the first ever Digital Distribution Guide (TM) utilized by filmmakers and industry alike.  TFC was commissioned to write a report on the topic for uniFRANCE to help its sales agents to navigate new media and has advised Sundance on its new “artists services” digital distribution initiative. TFC is releasing a book about distribution entitled Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul that will be available in multiple digital formats and in paperback as of September 19, 2011.

From 2007 -2009 Orly served as VP of Acquisitions and Distribution of publicly traded Berlin-based Senator Entertainment. Orly regularly moderates or speaks on panels at Sundance and other film festivals regarding new technology and digital distribution. Orly served as a Programming Associate for documentaries at the Sundance Film Festival and as Programming Consultant for Palm Springs International. Orly has served on the Board of Directors of Outfest Los Angeles Film Festival. Orly earned a B.A in English Literature and Film Studies at Columbia University and graduated with honors.

The Film Collaborative Website

Film Method Hosts

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What happens in your movie? Both TO the character and IN the character?

September 20, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under Writing Method

What happens in your movie? Both TO the character and IN the character?

When developing a story for a screenplay, you need to make sure that you’re considering both the physical action of the story and the character’s emotional arc. It can be easy to favor one over the other or to neglect one altogether.

I had these conversations with clients recently. Some specifics have been changed to protect the property, but apart from that, here’s how it went.

#1

Me: So tell me about your movie.

Client: Well, it’s set in 1715 on the coast in Japan. It’s about these four women. One’s an acrobat—she has a famous father, one’s an immigrant—her parents were killed in a car crash, one’s an architect—she also loves poetry and one’s a domestic worker who’s about to get engaged.

Me: Okay, so what happens?

Client: Well, they all deal with their lives and they learn to be stronger people.

Me: But what happens?

Client: Well, like the acrobat wonders if she should be following in the family business. The domestic worker wonders if she should really marry this guy—

Me: Okay. But what happens?

#2

Me: So tell me about your movie.

Client: Well, this guy finds out that the material that will save his cat is under the ground in his neighbor’s yard. So first, he calls up the vet, but the thing is the vet is actually a “vet”—like he went to war—so he gets all weird and says that he’ll help him, but only if the guy first helps avenge the death of his fellow soldiers. So the guys go and do that and it turns out that the guy who the vet wants the guy to kill is actually his neighbor, so the guy thinks that’s great because now he can get the mineral that’s in the neighbor’s yard, but the neighbor paves over the entire yard and then the guy’s wife is dying, so the one guy can’t kill the other guy unless he kills the wife too, so he has to go track her down so that he can get them both in the same place and he and the vet go on the road together. So it’s like a buddy comedy with an assassin angle.

Me: Okay. So what happens?

Both of these pitches leave out a key element. The first told us quite a bit about the characters…but lacked plot. The second had the opposite problem.

When developing an idea for a script, your story should have both elements. There should be action and events that your character initiates and deals with. There should also be an emotional transformation as well. Ideally, these two threads are related.

Here are some wildly random examples from real life:

Wall Street

Plot: An up and coming stock broker gets a chance to make millions working for his idol.

Emotion: Once after money, fame and power, Bud learns that what he really wants is his moral fiber and his father’s respect.

The Shawshank Redemption

Plot: A man escapes from prison.

Emotion: A man used to just taking life as it was dealt to him learns to stand up for himself,  takes charge of his life and escape physical as well as emotional captivity.

The Change Up

Plot: Two men switch bodies.

Emotion: Best friends come to respect each other while more deeply appreciating their own lives.

The King’s Speech

Plot: A man hires a tutor to fix his speech impediment.

Emotion: A prince who believes he does not deserve the honor of being king overcomes his lack of confidence to accept the throne and lead his country during its most difficult hour.

Inception

Plot: A man is hired to go inside a someone’s dream and change his mind.

Emotion: A man must come to terms with the death of his wife…while still seeing her spirit every day at work.

Without the emotional layer, the plots sound kind of boring. And without the action of the plot, the emotions sound kind of schmaltzy. But put them together and you have movie magic!

Well, maybe not with The Change Up, but you get what I’m saying.

Here’s how the first pitch might sound if a plot were added.

Client: Well, it’s set in Japan, 1715. Four women decide that since the country still has a ban on Western literature, they’re going to form an underground book club. They work to smuggle books across the country, teach other women English and hide their meetings from the authorities. The work affects them all differently and as they read stories, they each begin to rewrite the story of their own lives. One realizes that her family’s business is a worthwhile career choice. One realizes that she must break off her wedding. One finally gets up the nerve to publish her own book. And one adopts a child to create the family she didn’t think she deserved.

Now we know the plot of the story: Four friends form a secret club.

And some sense of the emotional through line: By taking a risk, stifled people learn to open up.

The second could be helped like this:

Client: Well, it’s about guy who’s afraid to interact with people so he loves his pet cat more than anything else. In fact, he hates humanity as much as he loves his cat. He hates people so much that when he learns that the only way to save his cat’s life is to kill 2-3 people, he’s willing to do it; so he plans and trains to be hit man. But when he begins to develop relationships with his tutors (the girl who teaches him how to fire a weapon, the guy who helps him get fitted for Kevlar, etc.) he learns that people aren’t so bad after all and faces a tough choice between his cat and his new friends.

Plot: Angry guy becomes a hit man to save his pet’s life.

Emotion: Shy guy learns to connect with people.

Your script will need both of these elements in order to register with audiences. Explosions and plot twists are fun, but it’s the emotion tying it all together that makes it meaningful and memorable.

Film Method Extravaganza!

September 7, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under news

September 7, 2011

This is an exciting week for Film Method! We’ve got tons of new stuff for you including a new episode with director Varda Hardy, new photos from our latest photo shoot, contests and more! A new feature, Writing Method with Aydrea Walden starts this week as well. Poke around the website- we’ve got some new images and new features that you won’t want to miss!

Film Method’s Support from Start to Finish feature focuses on Varda Hardy’s Kickstarter campaign for her musical documentary Big Voice this month.

The contest to win Eve Light Honthaner’s book The Complete Film Production Handbook starts this week as well as the race to get 1,000 Facebook followers. The 1,000th follower will win a 2 hour consult with co-host and producing advisor Jenna Edwards!

Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and tell your friends about us, too!

Q: How do you make a budget?

August 31, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under Mail Bag

Q: How do you make a budget?

Carla M., Gainesville Florida

I always say, “the budget is the script for a producer”. Meaning, without a budget the producer cannot do their job effectively.  Making a budget is a very creative process. It’s kind of like writing a script. When you first start to make budgets there will be a lot of research involved. You will need to make phone calls and look online for quotes and the cost of certain things in the budget. Once you’ve done a few budgets, you have less research, but there is always some research involved. Then when you get those quotes, you will need to use those numbers to fill the budget in. Like writing a script, the process of making a budget is different for everyone. You need to know the parameters:  How much money can likely be raised? How many shoot days? What SAG agreement do you fall under?  What level of crew can we afford?  Are you making a movie with friends and neighbors?  Where are you shooting?  How many locations, cast members, scripts days, etc?  For me, once I know these parameters and I’ve filled in the budget for the first time, I tend to need to process it. It is usually well over what I want it to be so I then go back and start dwindling it down. Sometimes, I need to leave it alone for a day and just let it sit in my head and I’ll come up with a creative solution to the budgeting issues I’m having. The thing to remember is that the budget is an ever-changing thing. For example; you will find that someone on the production team knows someone who can get something in the art department’s wish-list for free that you had budgeted at $100 but that the grip equipment you thought was going to cost you $50 is actually $150 and so you move the money for the art department into the grip department.  The budget is constantly changing so remember that it’s a guide and don’t get too stuck on where you put the money initially. You must be able to see the big picture and stay within your total budget cost while being flexible within those parameters. Measure twice and cut once as they say.  Make sure you’ve done enough research that you can confidently say you can make the film for the amount in the budget. There’s nothing worse than not being able to finish because of budgeting incorrectly.

Episode Seventy-Seven: Director-Actor Relationship

June 22, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

The relationship between the director and actor in any medium is a very special one. Trust is of the utmost importance and when established early on can give the actor a freedom to explore and create in such a way that can help serve the story and the film. Chasing Eagle Rock is veteran TV and film actor Erick Avari’s directing debut. He also stars in the indie film opposite Michael Welch of Twilight fame. Producer Larry Laboe also joins us to talk about the film.

Erick Avari- Director-Producer

During his 30 years as an actor, Erick Avari has consistently turned in finely crafted performances, from grand opera to soap opera, with stops on and Off Broadway, in regional theaters, in some of the highest grossing films in the past two decades, on hit television series and in award-winning independent films.

Avari is instantly recognizable from his roles in blockbuster films ranging from the comedic Mr. Deeds, opposite Adam Sandler; to sci fi epics such as The Mummy, with Rachel Weisz and Brandon Fraser; Stargate, with Kurt Russell and James Spader; Independence Day, starring Will Smith, and Daredevil, as Jennifer Garner’s father. He has also lent his talents to critically acclaimed dramatic roles in film festival favorites American East, with Tony Shalhoub; Dark Matter, starring Meryl Streep; Three Days of Rain, with Peter Falk and Blythe Danner; and Choose Conner, with Steven Weber.

Since his Hollywood debut in Kevin Reynold’s The Beast of War, he has been fortunate to work with some of the most honored film directors of the time, including Mike Nichols, Tim Burton, Lasse Hallström and Satyajit Ray.

Born in Darjeeling, India, Avari attended European boarding schools before attending university in the US. He launched a distinguished career on the New York stage that included leading roles in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” (directed by Tony winner A.J. Antoon), “Tis Pity She’s a Whore” (directed by Mabou Mines founder Joanne Akalaitis) and “A Map of the World” (written and directed by David Hare) at the Joseph Papp Public Theater, as well as the classic musical “The King and I” on Broadway.

He has appeared at some of the country’s most prestigious regional theaters, including the Tyrone Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, the Goodman Theater in Chicago and Shakespeare and Company in the Berkshiers, and played leading roles in Mozart’s “Abduction from the Seraglio” at the Portland Grand Opera, and in “Rasputin” at New York City Opera.

Among his scores of television roles are Chandra Suresh on NBC’s breakout hit series “Heroes,” as well as recurring roles on LA Dragnet, Stargate SG-1 and Felicity. Avari’s recent television appearances also include Dirty Sexy Money, opposite Peter Krause and Law and Order: Criminal Intent.

Versatile, dedicated and dynamic, Avari has been a trailblazer for a generation of South Asian actors in Hollywood. In his fight against stereotypical casting, he has played more than two dozen different ethnicities with authority and believability.
Chasing Eagle Rock marks Avari’s Directorial debut.

Chasing Eagle Rock on Facebook

Michael Welch- Actor

At 23, Michael Welch has worked in every aspect of the entertainment business including film, television, voice-over, and stage. Michael is the recipient of two Young Artist Awards.  First for his performance in Star Trek – Insurrection at age 10, and the second for his work as Luke Girardi on the hit television series Joan of Arcadia, which ran for two seasons on CBS.  Welch won best actor at the 2011 First Glance Film Festival in Hollywood for his portrayal of a troubled young man in Unrequited.

Michael completed filming The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn recently, the fourth in the series of best-selling novels by Stephenie Meyer. He has enjoyed wide exposure for his role as the popular Mike Newton in the Twilight series and much acclaim from within the industry and his many fans.

In the last few years, Welch demonstrates his intense depth and commitment to his craft by assuming challenging roles as the leading man.  Independent films such as Born Bad, Unrequited and Lost Dream are just some examples. In  Chasing Eagle Rock, Michael plays the role of J.R opposite Erick Avari.  Welch can be seen in award-winning festival favorites such as My Suicide, An American Crime, United States of Leland, American Son, All the Boys Love Mandy Lane, and The Cover-up.

Welch is familiar to television audiences for his many starring roles on Emmy Award-winning shows, most recently Criminal Minds and Bones.   During the past few years he appeared on CSI, an arch on The Riches, CSI: Miami, Numb3rs, Law & Order: SVU, Crossing Jordan, NCIS, Cold Case, and Without a Trace. His earlier years included performances on Stargate SG-1, Judging Amy, The District, Touched by an Angel, Malcolm in the Middle, The X-Files, The Pretender, 7th Heaven, Chicago Hope, and Frasier.

In spite of his busy schedule, it is essential to Michael to give back. He received the 2005 Star Innovative Award for environmental causes and has been active with the charity Kids With a Cause since 1999.  During 2010, Welch was invited to Germany by the USO for their first educational tour for young people. Recently, Welch was Co-Chair for Walk on The Horizon, an event to raise awareness and resources for adults with disabilities.  Just last year, Michael created the $5.00 Buck Club for The Thirst Project.  His goal was to prove to young people that $5.00 can make a difference.  He raised $20,000 and is looking forward to going to South Africa, Kruger National Park and Swaziland with The Thirst Project in December, 2011.

Michael on Twitter

Larry Laboe- Producer

Larry Laboe began producing film, television, commercials and new media projects with international production and distribution company SXM. His first network series was NBC’s ‘Ctrl’ starring Tony Hale and Steve Howey. Mr. Laboe more recently began work as a producer on Comedy Central’s series Matumbo Goldberg starring Anthony Anderson, Jenna Elfman and Oscar Nominee Michael Lerner, Directed by Oscar nominated Rob Pearlstein and NBC’s FCU: Fact Checkers Unit starring Pauley Perrette, Luke Perry, Jon Heder, Donald Faison, Alex Trebeck and more. Mr. Laboe also produced two series, Disney Kitchen Jam and Diagnosis Stories for Disney Interactive and the feature film Chasing Eagle Rock starring Erick Avari, Michael Welch and Mary-Margaret Humes.

In 2007 Mr. Laboe co-founded the non-profit 501(c) 3 organization NewFilmmakers Los Angeles with partner and Program Director Susie Kim. In an effort to bring opportunity to independent filmmakers, film goers and entertainment industry professionals in Los Angeles, Mr. Laboe works as Executive Director of the group and coordinates NFMLA film screenings on a monthly basis, along with an on-camera filmmaker interview series distributed by MovieMaker Magazine.

Jenna Edwards- Producer, Film Method Co-Host

For more information about Jenna Edwards please visit the About page.

Producing Sunflowers Website
Burbank International Film Fest

Episode Sixty-Five: The First Day of Production

March 2, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

Kicking off Season 3: Production is producing/directing team Chris Uettwiller and Tom Vaughan who recently finished their feature film, Playing House, which is Tom’s directorial debut. Tom and Chris talk about the first day on set and the value of having solid pre-production. They also discuss their 7-year partnership and how that helped them to have a successful shoot.

Tom Vaughan- Writer/Director

Tom Vaughan studied at the University of Houston with Broadway legend Jose Quintero and three-time Pulitzer Prize winner Edward Albee. It was his work as a writer and director in Houston theatre that got him recognized by Hollywood. He was soon writing screenplays for, among others, Phoenix Pictures, Spelling Films, Rysher Entertainment, TNT, MTV Films, Castle Rock Entertainment, Sony Pictures, Disney and Warner Brothers.
His productions as a writer include Blackout with Jane Seymour for CBS, and Critical Assembly with Katherine Heigl (Grey’s Anatomy, Knocked Up) for NBC. He served as writer as well as Co-Producer on Atomic Twister with Sharon Lawrence and Dead in a Heartbeat with Penelope Anne Miller and Judge Reinhold, both for TBS. His feature film debut was Unstoppable, starring Wesley Snipes. His script, Bronwyn and Clyde, which he co-wrote with Kristy Dobkin, was recently set-up at Essential Entertainment. UV Pictures, his partnership with Chris Uettwiller, is producing with Dolly Hall. It is targeted for a $30 million production and Tom is fighting hard to have it filmed in Houston.

Playing House, written with Ms. Dobkin, is his feature film directorial debut. They most recently wrote Hallelujah together, the English language debut for acclaimed Japanese director Kazuika Kiriya (Casshern, Goemon).

Since returning to Houston he has dedicated himself to small organizations aimed at expanding Houston’s theatre and film community. He has been teaching screenwriting for nine years and finds it as gratifying as actually practicing it.

Chris Uettwiller- Producer

Chris Uettwiller started his entertainment career in 1992 under the direction of acclaimed independent producer Dolly Hall. After working in a variety of production positions, he moved on to co-create and write Showtime’s Twisted Puppet Theatre, and the award winning comedy series Chop Suey TV for USA Network. Chris again teamed up with Hall in 1998 at GreeneStreet Films, serving as Head of Production and R&D for the Digital Film Division. His division’s first film was Griffin Dunne’s Lisa Picard is Famous, which competed at the Cannes Film Festival. Subsequent films included Jessie Peretz’ Inherited Chateau staring Paul Rudd, and Fisher Steven’s directorial debut Just a Kiss.
In 2000 Chris moved to Los Angeles to help start the Visual Effects/Production outfit The Orphanage where he served as Head of Production and Development. By the time Chris decided to make a move back to independent producing The Orphanage had grown to over 250 full time employees. It was then that UV Pictures was formed with Tom Vaughan.

In 2004, Chris produced Elton John’s The Red Piano (currently running in Las Vegas) and several music videos and commercials for acclaimed photographer/director David LaChapelle. In 2006 he was executive producer on the sports/reality series Guide House: Montauk, which aired on ESPN. He also serves as Creative Director and Executive Producer for several of RedBull North America’s brand building events including Dragster Day, Flugtag and Billy Cart. His next project Bronwyn and Clyde, producing along with Dolly Hall, written by Vaughan and Dobkin will be financed by Essential Pictures.

Jenna Edwards- Producer/Co-Host

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by Agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process, before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Super Bad, The Office). During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working on shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Malcolm in the Middle, and working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers. After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they made, In the Darkness,  the first narrative feature to ever premiere on Hulu.com.  Most recently Edwards made her way back to Nebraska, where she shot April Showers, to team up with some new filmmakers on a comedy film called Trunk’d.

Episode Fifty-Seven: Shorts ‘N Spirits Promo Show

November 9, 2010 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

The next Shorts ‘N Spirits Showcase will be held this Thursday, November 11th and Film Method will be apart of it! This screening series showcases short format projects including short films, music videos and web series. Craig Wilson and Mel Huffman of Shorts ‘N Spirits join us to talk about what films will be screening at the event. John Carrozza, Executive Producer of the web series Pretty joins us as well to talk about the series and about screening at the Shorts ‘N Spirits Showcase on Thursday.

John Carrozza-Executive Producer

John Carrozza helped form Velvet 
Candy Entertainment, LLC in 2006 with a mission to tell 
unique and compelling stories with diverse LGBT characters 
and strong crossover appeal.

The award-winning Socket (the world’s first gay science fiction thriller) was John’s first 
stab at co-producing a feature, but Velvet 
Candy has completed 
several other projects including the short films Rubdown, Screening Party, The Defenders and Reunion, which was funded by 
the HBO Shout Short Film Competition. John has also executive produced the web series Pretty which debuted in January 2010.  Coming up later in the year is the short film Rubdown, which will appear in film festivals across the country.

John has also recently produced the upcoming 
musical comedy The Mikado Project, which premiered at the 2010 Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival and Qwerty, a straight-ish office sex comedy completed and shopping for distribution.  John lives and works in Burbank, CA with his husband Doug and their dogs.

Craig Wilson-Producer/Director

Craig started his 12 year career in entertainment as an Artistic Director for a black box theater troop. In 2003 he graduated Los Angeles Film School majoring in Directing and minoring in Producing. Since that time he has worked as a Producer, Director, First Assistant Director, Grip, Electrician, Craft Service and Production Assistant in television and film. He has produced two independent feature films, is in pre-production for one and is in development of another, both slated to shoot 2010. He has also Event Coordinated and Produced five world premiere screenings, four monthly networking events and is currently a Producer for the San Diego Indie Festival Film Stage.

Mel Huffman-Event Coordinator/Production Designer

Mel’s passion has always been art. After creating her first work at the age of 5, she joined the Buena Park Civic Center Arts earning multiple awards for her oil paintings. Spending years working backstage with her family on productions, she found her calling behind the scenes. She has previously worked closely with such artists as Artis Lane, Richard MacDonald, and Ricky Swallow at the LA Fine Art Foundry. Mel helped these artists create their vision in fine art bronze sculpture. Mel is also the Los Angles Regional Manager for Mental Eclectic, assisting Southern California filmmakers in production, networking and marketing. She has now dedicated herself to a full time career in the film industry. Mel produced The Return of the El Diablo, which premiered at Geekfest in Mexicalli in 2009. She was also the on-set dresser for The Guild season 3 in addition to working as the production designer for Simply Simon, Art Director for the music video Feel Better by Nikki Lang and Production Designer for the web series The Last.

Episode Fifty-Five: Introducing the FM Mail Bag with a Filmmaker Q&A

October 11, 2010 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

We’re excited to announce a new feature called the Film Method Mail Bag! You, the listener, now have the opportunity to get those pressing questions answered about making your own film. Join producers Jenna Edwards and Cooper Harris and Producer/Director/DP Ace Underhill as we kick off this new feature and answer some listener questions. To have your questions answered, email info@film-method.com or send your Tweet with #fmmailbag or #filmmethod.

Cooper Harris- Producer/Actor

A recent graduate of the prestigious North Carolina School of the Arts, Cooper happily herself paying her bills acting and producing!  She recently starred in the SyFy Channel’s upcoming thriller, Meteor Apocalypse and just wrapped the title role in a rom-com opposite Josh Sussman (Glee) and Lochlyn Munro. Cooper was seen this summer as the new host for Red Bull, as well as in campaigns for DishNetwork, POM, Microsoft and the groundbreaking new LG campaign. Cooper produced and stars in DailyMotion’s first original comedy series, Squatters. She is also a writer/producer of award-winning transmedia commercial campaigns for companies such as Post It Notes, Kimberly Clark, and Krazy Glue. Upcoming, Cooper can be seen as the title character in the upcoming thriller, The Resurrection of Serious Rogers. www.CooperHarris.net

Ace Underhill- Director of Photography

Ace Underhill has worked in the film and television industry for over 13 years, blending extensive technical knowledge with an award-winning artistic edge.  He founded Brilliant Screen Studios, a full service film & television studio as well as a feature film production company.  He has served on the San Diego Filmmakers Board of Directors and was part of the Advisory Group to the San Diego Film Commission.  Brilliant Screen also supplies productions of all sizes with crew, consultation, and equipment. Brilliant Screen Studios

Jenna Edwards- Producer

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by Agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process, before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Super Bad, The Office). During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working on shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Malcolm in the Middle, and working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers. After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they made, In the Darkness,  the first narrative feature to ever premiere on Hulu.com.  Most recently Edwards made her way back to Nebraska, where she shot April Showers, to team up with some new filmmakers on a comedy film called Trunk’d.

Mattoid Entertainment’s Website
Mattoid on Facebook

Film Method at Icons Event Sat, July 24

July 18, 2010 by cindy  
Filed under news

Film Method will be apart of an exciting event at this week’s Comic Con in San Diego. The event will take place at the Horton Plaza Event Center and will feature iconic artists of our day from all facets of pop culture. The 30,000-square foot space will be divided into FOUR massive sections, all paying homage to pop culture including Music Concert, Film Screenings, Art Show, and Fashion Experience. The daytime portion will go from 11 am to 5 pm. Admission is $5.00 and open to all ages. The Nighttime portion is from 9 pm to 2 am and Admission is $15.00. The party is 21 & up only. For tickets and more information visit the website at www.westcoastclublife.com/icons or find Icons on Facebook.

Happy Independence Week!

July 6, 2010 by cindy  
Filed under news

July 6, 2010

There won’t be a podcast this week because of the holiday, but we will resume next week. We at Film Method hope that you and your family had an awesome Independence Day!

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