Episode Eighty-Six: Wrapping Up Production

September 28, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

For our last episode of our season about production we bring back the lovely and talented producer and author Eve Light Honthaner. Eve has worked in numerous production offices in the span of multiple years that she’s worked in this industry. We discuss the end of principal photography and transitioning into post-production.

Eve Light Honthaner- Producer/Author/Teacher

Eve’s career in the entertainment industry spans many years, primarily in the field of production management.  She’s worked in every capacity from PA to line producer and as a staff production executive, most recently for DreamWorks.  She’s worked on shows budgeted anywhere from $1 – $250 million and on projects that have been shot throughout the U.S. and internationally, including Titanic, Just Married and Tropic Thunder.

Eve is the author of The Complete Film Production Handbook and HOLLYWOOD DRIVE: What it Takes to Break in, Hang in & Make it in the Entertainment Industry.  And since 1998, she’s combined her many years of practical experience with a love of teaching to help others succeed in this fiercely competitive business.

In addition to the six-week course she teaches at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts each summer, schedule permitting, she does one- and two-day workshops throughout the country.

Eve’s Website- http://evehonthaner.com

Film Method Hosts

For more information about the Film Method hosts, please visit the About page.

Episode Eighty-Four: The Union Show

September 14, 2011 by cindy  
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To go union or not to go union. That is the question. Line producer Mark Moran and production coordinator Molly Moran bring their expertise from working on numerous film projects in their 10+ years of being in the film industry to discuss all of the film unions including SAG, IATSE, Teamsters, DGA and the WGA. Their knowledge of working with unions is vast and impressive.

Mark Moran- Line Producer

Mark Moran has helped create a wide range of studio and independent movies, including 96 Minutes (Brittany Snow), Beautiful Boy (Maria Bello), 13 (Jason Statham), Spread (Ashton Kutcher), Pretty Bird (Paul Giamatti), Walk the Talk (Cary Elwes), Bee Season (Richard Gere), Basic (John Travolta), Secretary (Maggie Gyllenhaal), Sweet Home Alabama (Reese Witherspoon), and Novocaine (Steve Martin). He has produced features shooting all over the U.S. as well as in Canada and Eastern Europe.

Mark is a member of the Producer’s Guild of America and the Directors Guild of America. He has produced short films, web series, music videos, and commercials, as well as the PBS documentary Chavez Ravine: A Los Angeles Story, which won the IDA Award for Best Short Documentary and was short-listed for an Academy Award in 2005.

Prior to all this, Mark started a software company at age 17, launching him on a successful career designing and programming computer games in San Francisco, where he received a patent for a CGI process combining filmed live action with computer animation.

Mark graduated summa cum laude from Columbia University with a degree in literature & writing.

Mark Moran’s Website

Molly Moran- Production Coordinator and Accountant

Molly Moran is a film production coordinator and accountant. She began her career in 2004 working on indie features in New York, Connecticut, and New Hampshire. She then spent two years working for famed producer Barbara DeFina, who encouraged her to focus on production office work as the best training for producing. This led to her spending a year working on the Will Smith movie I Am Legend. In 2007, she moved to Los Angeles and has since coordinated features shooting in Georgia, Louisiana, and California.

New to Los Angeles Part Two

August 26, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under Mail Bag

I want to do something different for my next two posts.  In the past two weeks, I’ve sat down with several “transplants” new to LA.   I noticed they all had similar questions so I want to point out some things you should know if you are thinking of making the move to Los Angeles to pursue the film business.

Have business cards

Please take this business seriously.  If you owned your own accounting business, it wouldn’t even be a question that you would have business cards.  Show biz is the same way (maybe even more so).  We are networking crazies. I, personally, love it!  I love meeting new people but I tell you what, if they don’t have a business card, part of me thinks a little less of them just because I don’t think they are taking it seriously.  If you are an actor, please have your picture on your card.  It’s the easiest tool for you to use to get jobs out here.

Expect to work for free

The people that work in this business and have been doing it awhile more likely than not, have a group of people they trust, they’ve worked with before and they know can get the job done. If you expect to get into that inner circle, you’re going to have to prove yourself and not many people are willing to take a chance on someone they don’t know unless that person is willing to bust their ass for free to prove they are reliable and worthy of the person’s time.  It’s just a reality of the business out here.  I’m not saying it will be forever, but there is truth to the saying “it’s all who you know”.  You have to be able to do the job when you get it, but getting it is in who you know. So, if you don’t know anyone then you need to mentally and economically prepare to work for free so that they can get to know you.

Don’t put a time limit on it

Honestly, the statistic I’ve heard is that it takes 7 to 10 years to make it as an “over-night” success in Hollywood (so imagine what it takes to just be a “success”.  So, if you’re one of those people who thinks they’re going to come out here for a year and try to make it big and if you don’t then you’ll go home, then I say, please don’t bother.  The highways are crowded enough and it’s an insult to those of us who have busted our asses for years out here.

Don’t give up!

It’s a tough business and you have to be able to find joy in the little parts of it like auditioning, networking, taking classes, reading, studying, all of that.  If you don’t, this town can surely eat you alive.  Most importantly, find a group of people with similar aspirations and support each other.  I often hear people say that LA is “fake” and “dog eat dog”, and it certainly can be.  But, for me, I have never been in a more supportive, understanding and loving environment.  Make sure you surround yourself with good, positive people and enjoy the ride because it can be quite a ride.


Q: If you’re a writer/producer what’s the first hire you should make in terms of getting a project financed and started?

August 23, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under Mail Bag

Q: If you’re a writer/producer what’s the first hire you should make in terms of getting a project financed and started?

Eric F., Scottsdale Arizona

This is a tricky question because there is not one answer.  It really depends on where you’re at in your career as a filmmaker, what kind of investor you are going after, what kind of film you are making, where it is going and who your contacts in the business already are.  If you are a 1st time writer/producer, I would recommend that your first hire be a producer who has done this before.  I say this because there is a lot to navigate and this person will most likely be able to help guide you through the process.  Do your research and know when you are hiring an honest and experienced producer.  Make sure that you and that person communicate well and can work together on a daily basis.  You are about to spend a lot of time with each other and it should be an enriching process. Typically when you’re a writer, you think mostly creatively (which is good) but the process of turning your script into an actual moving picture is more business than creative in the beginning.  You will need someone who understands budgets and business and it doesn’t hurt if they are good at negotiating.  Just a heads up – as the writer/producer of the project I would be prepared to write a lot of things you wouldn’t normally be writing like the verbiage for the business plan, website content, etc.

Episode Seventy-Five: Eve Light Honthaner

June 8, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

Since the time the Film Method podcast began we have been talking about Eve Light Honthaner and her amazing book The Complete Film Production Handbook! Eve has worked on many films including Titanic, Just Married and Tropic Thunder. She joins us to give some helpful tips for producers for the day that your film finally reaches principal photography. We briefly touch on many topics including working with animals, working with children, using purchase orders and hiring the right people for the job.

Eve Light Honthaner- Producer/Author/Teacher

Eve’s career in the entertainment industry spans many years, primarily in the field of production management.  She’s worked in every capacity from PA to line producer and as a staff production executive, most recently for DreamWorks.  She’s worked on shows budgeted anywhere from $1 – $250 million and on projects that have been shot throughout the U.S. and internationally, including Titanic, Just Married and Tropic Thunder.

She’s the author of The Complete Film Production Handbook and HOLLYWOOD DRIVE: What it Takes to Break in, Hang in & Make it in the Entertainment Industry.  And since 1998, she’s combined her many years of practical experience with a love of teaching to help others succeed in this fiercely competitive business.

In addition to the six-week course she teaches at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts each summer, schedule permitting, she does one- and two-day workshops throughout the country.

Eve’s Website- http://evehonthaner.com

Jenna Edwards- Producer, Film Method Co-Host

For more information about Jenna Edwards please visit the About page.

Producing Sunflowers Website
Burbank International Film Fest

Lynda Lopez- Producer

Lynda Lopez started her career in film as a Production Designer working on student films with friends from art school where she was a Graphic Design major. She then went on to assist some very talented Production Designers on studio films while still working in various capacities on short films and indie films. Due to her fascination for all aspects of filmmaking, she has become more involved with the Production side of things working as a Director’s Assistant and Producer.

Lynda is currently working on a charity project for All Hands Volunteers, a non-profit organization that provides hands-on assistance to survivors of natural disasters around the world. For more information about Lynda’s project to help this organization please visit Film Method’s Facebook page.

For more information on All Hands Volunteers visit their website at http://hands.org/

Episode Seventy: The Hierarchy on Set

May 4, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

When you’re on a film set, like in any business, there is a certain structure that should be followed in order to finish your day and ultimately to finish your film. Of course on a film set, just like in any business, things don’t always go according to plan, and this is when the members of the crew need to get creative. The 1st A.D. is the eyes and ears of what goes on during principle photography and most of the decisions that are made on set go through him or her. Frank Caridi joins us to talk about the hierarchy on set, set etiquette, and who can fire who.

Frank Caridi- Film Worker

Frank started his film career in Chicago in the mid 90′s, first in industrial videos, then in the fast paced, insanely challenging indie film scene.  In Chicago in the 1990′s, being an indie film worker means you are comfortable wearing several hats on set, and possibly a bartender’s apron off set.  He became an integral part of a film production team headed by Christina Varotsis, and known for its resourcefulness and stretching budgets to the breaking point. That reputation landed that crew the first season of HBO’s Project Greenlight.

After a the minor notoriety and Hollywood Awakening of Project Greenlight, Frank decided to move to Los Angeles.  Although he left the bartender’s apron behind, he did manage to bring both his love of rough and tumble low budget film making as well as his solid, Midwestern work ethic.  The rush of overcoming the challenges of making a film happen without the comforts and resources of an ample budget became addictive, and a niche as a low budget 1st AD was found…then abandoned for the paycheck of commercial production.

After years of working in commercials in Los Angeles, Frank returned to independent production to make music videos as head of production for both Propeller Productions and then for Highway 114.  Producing music videos employed the creative problem solving of indie film production, but also introduced the creative freedom that is unique to short format videos.  Everything about music video production is short, including the business model of a music video production company.  When Josh Tickell of the Veggie Van Organization approached Frank to build and promote a sustainable vehicle to promote the theatrical release of his film, FUEL, Frank became a builder and green engineer.

Frank’s Email Address: madcap1314@gmail.com

Lynda Lopez- Producer

Lynda Lopez started her career in film as a Production Designer working on student films with friends from art school where she was a Graphic Design major. She then went on to assist some very talented Production Designers on studio films while still working in various capacities on short films and indie films. Due to her fascination for all aspects of filmmaking, she has become more involved with the Production side of things working as a Director’s Assistant and Producer.

Jenna Edwards- Producer

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process. Before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as; Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Superbad, The Office).

During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers and has since successfully produced 4 feature films as well as co-hosting the Film Method podcast and teaching producing classes at New York Film Academy.

After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they produced the first ever made-for-internet movie, In the Darkness, which premiered on Hulu.com. Mattoid has recently made the leap to distribution, where they have acquired three feature documentaries to be released in 2011.  The first, Adopting Haiti premiered as the #1 documentary on Hulu.com.

Aside from continuing to work at Mattoid, Jenna is busy working on budgets for several independent films, producing 2 feature films and developing projects for television as well as teaching producing at New York Film Academy.

Producing Sunflowers Website

Burbank International Film Festival

Episode Sixty-Six: Bank On It

March 16, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

The  second episode of our season about production, highlights a very important element in starting production, the money. Executive Producer Tony Boldi stops by to share some of his experiences with us and to explain the pros and cons of starting production without all the money in the bank.

Tony Boldi- Executive Producer

Tony has completed over 500 plus projects from acting to producing since moving to Southern California back in 1996. He is the project manager for a television series which is based on an Academy Award accredited feature film from his current distribution company.

Tony is one of the owners of a very successful acting school in Hollywood (BCC: Boldi/Cardwell-Classes for the serious actor) with his business partner Steve Cardwell from his former acting school where he just received his PhD.

Tony has drummed with, performed with and been the DJ to countless celebrities over his career and was even the Key Art Awards Stage Director at the famous Kodak Theatre where they hold the Academy Awards each year. He was the casting director as well as the drummer for the Armenian Grammy Award Winning Best Music Video of the Year Ashoon starring SAKO.

Tony just recently finished writing two of his own original screen plays entitled Humble Pie and The Ultimate Chess Move which are both due out sometime in the near future.

Jenna Edwards- Producer/Co-Host

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by Agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process, before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Super Bad, The Office). During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working on shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Malcolm in the Middle, and working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers. After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they made, In the Darkness,  the first narrative feature to ever premiere on Hulu.com.  Most recently Edwards made her way back to Nebraska, where she shot April Showers, to team up with some new filmmakers on a comedy film called Trunk’d.

Episode Sixty-Five: The First Day of Production

March 2, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

Kicking off Season 3: Production is producing/directing team Chris Uettwiller and Tom Vaughan who recently finished their feature film, Playing House, which is Tom’s directorial debut. Tom and Chris talk about the first day on set and the value of having solid pre-production. They also discuss their 7-year partnership and how that helped them to have a successful shoot.

Tom Vaughan- Writer/Director

Tom Vaughan studied at the University of Houston with Broadway legend Jose Quintero and three-time Pulitzer Prize winner Edward Albee. It was his work as a writer and director in Houston theatre that got him recognized by Hollywood. He was soon writing screenplays for, among others, Phoenix Pictures, Spelling Films, Rysher Entertainment, TNT, MTV Films, Castle Rock Entertainment, Sony Pictures, Disney and Warner Brothers.
His productions as a writer include Blackout with Jane Seymour for CBS, and Critical Assembly with Katherine Heigl (Grey’s Anatomy, Knocked Up) for NBC. He served as writer as well as Co-Producer on Atomic Twister with Sharon Lawrence and Dead in a Heartbeat with Penelope Anne Miller and Judge Reinhold, both for TBS. His feature film debut was Unstoppable, starring Wesley Snipes. His script, Bronwyn and Clyde, which he co-wrote with Kristy Dobkin, was recently set-up at Essential Entertainment. UV Pictures, his partnership with Chris Uettwiller, is producing with Dolly Hall. It is targeted for a $30 million production and Tom is fighting hard to have it filmed in Houston.

Playing House, written with Ms. Dobkin, is his feature film directorial debut. They most recently wrote Hallelujah together, the English language debut for acclaimed Japanese director Kazuika Kiriya (Casshern, Goemon).

Since returning to Houston he has dedicated himself to small organizations aimed at expanding Houston’s theatre and film community. He has been teaching screenwriting for nine years and finds it as gratifying as actually practicing it.

Chris Uettwiller- Producer

Chris Uettwiller started his entertainment career in 1992 under the direction of acclaimed independent producer Dolly Hall. After working in a variety of production positions, he moved on to co-create and write Showtime’s Twisted Puppet Theatre, and the award winning comedy series Chop Suey TV for USA Network. Chris again teamed up with Hall in 1998 at GreeneStreet Films, serving as Head of Production and R&D for the Digital Film Division. His division’s first film was Griffin Dunne’s Lisa Picard is Famous, which competed at the Cannes Film Festival. Subsequent films included Jessie Peretz’ Inherited Chateau staring Paul Rudd, and Fisher Steven’s directorial debut Just a Kiss.
In 2000 Chris moved to Los Angeles to help start the Visual Effects/Production outfit The Orphanage where he served as Head of Production and Development. By the time Chris decided to make a move back to independent producing The Orphanage had grown to over 250 full time employees. It was then that UV Pictures was formed with Tom Vaughan.

In 2004, Chris produced Elton John’s The Red Piano (currently running in Las Vegas) and several music videos and commercials for acclaimed photographer/director David LaChapelle. In 2006 he was executive producer on the sports/reality series Guide House: Montauk, which aired on ESPN. He also serves as Creative Director and Executive Producer for several of RedBull North America’s brand building events including Dragster Day, Flugtag and Billy Cart. His next project Bronwyn and Clyde, producing along with Dolly Hall, written by Vaughan and Dobkin will be financed by Essential Pictures.

Jenna Edwards- Producer/Co-Host

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by Agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process, before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Super Bad, The Office). During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working on shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Malcolm in the Middle, and working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers. After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they made, In the Darkness,  the first narrative feature to ever premiere on Hulu.com.  Most recently Edwards made her way back to Nebraska, where she shot April Showers, to team up with some new filmmakers on a comedy film called Trunk’d.

Episode Sixty-Four: A History of Distribution Part 2

February 2, 2011 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

What better way to learn about distribution then from someone who oversaw distribution and marketing at Paramount, one of the most prestigious studios in the world. Barry London headed up marketing campaigns for some of the largest films of the 80′s and 90′s including Raiders of the Lost Ark, Fatal Attraction, and Forrest Gump. Barry sits down with us for a two part series and shares his experiences working at Paramount in various positions including Vice Chairman of Distribution.

Barry London- Former Vice Chairman of Distribution at Paramount

Barry London started at Paramount in distribution in 1971.  He was promoted to salesman in the Los Angeles Branch in 1972 and then transferred to Kansas City in 1973 as Kansas City/St. Louis Manager. In 1981, Barry was transferred to Los Angeles as Vice President Western Division, overseeing the six western branches and in 1983 he was transferred to New York as Vice President, General Sales Manager, overseeing all distribution activities in the U.S. and Canada.  Barry was promoted to President, Distribution, overseeing all distribution functions worldwide in 1984 and in 1985 he was promoted to President, Distribution and Marketing, adding marketing responsibilities, worldwide.  In 1988 Barry was named President, Motion Picture Group, overseeing all distribution, marketing, video and pay TV operations, worldwide and in 1993 he was named Vice Chairman, Motion Picture Group.  London left the executive position at Paramount in 1998 and took a production job there for two years.  After he left Paramount he became Chairman and CEO of startup Destination Films. He left Destination Films in 1993 and has been consulting since. Some of the films Barry was involved in at Paramount were the Star Trek movies, the Indiana Jones movies, Top Gun, Fatal Attraction, The Addams Family, Beverly Hills Cop, Ghost, The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games , Clear and Present Danger, Forrest Gump, and The Untouchables.

Jenna Edwards- Producer

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by Agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process, before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Super Bad, The Office). During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working on shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Malcolm in the Middle, and working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers. After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they made, In the Darkness,  the first narrative feature to ever premiere on Hulu.com.  Most recently Edwards made her way back to Nebraska, where she shot April Showers, to team up with some new filmmakers on a comedy film called Trunk’d.

Episode Sixty: Pre-Production in a Nutshell

December 8, 2010 by cindy  
Filed under episodes

You thought this day would never come, but it’s here! The release of the last episode of our Pre-Production Season! For this episode we recap the previous season in all of its glory. Producers Jenna Edwards, Aydrea ten Bosch, and John Paul Rice join me to revisit the season and discuss just how important pre-production is and how to lay the best plans to make your film a success!

Aydrea ten Bosch- Writer/Producer

Aydrea, a former news reporter, has been a freelance writer for Nickelodeon and Hawaii Film Partners, a staff writer for Disney and currently has a feature film in post production with Highlander Films. Aydrea has been a finalist in the AAA Creative Screenwriting Contest and while at Disney, one of her scripts was chosen to represent the network before the Emmy Nominating Committee. She also runs the blog The Oreo Experience.

For more information about Aydrea or to contact her please visit her website at www.theoreoexperience.com

Jenna Edwards- Producer

Jenna Edwards began her film career in Minnesota where she was signed on as talent with Easter Hailey. Quickly after being signed Edwards was hired by the agency as a full time employee giving her a head-start on her Hollywood education. After two years of rising through the Minnesota film community Edwards made the move to Los Angeles.

Soon after Edwards moved to Los Angeles she was hired by Agent Jamie Ferrar. It was while Edwards was working for Ferrar that she developed an interest in the casting process, before long she had moved from talent agencies to working in casting with such industry leaders as Sally Steiner (Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Boy Meets World), Barbie Block (Jonas, Pepper Dennis) and Allison Jones (Super Bad, The Office). During this time Edwards was also able to gain valuable production experience working on shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Malcolm in the Middle, and working with studios like Disney, MTV, FOX and CBS.

After several years of successfully navigating her career through the Hollywood studio system Edwards made the leap to independent film with her first feature April Showers. After her success with April Showers Edwards formed Mattoid Entertainment with partners Jeremy McGovern and Andrew Robinson where they made, In the Darkness,  the first narrative feature to ever premiere on Hulu.com.  Most recently Edwards made her way back to Nebraska, where she shot April Showers, to team up with some new filmmakers on a comedy film called Trunk’d.

Mattoid Website

John Paul Rice- Producer

John Paul Rice attended Georgia State University in 1997 with a focus on Business. In 1999, while at college, Mr. Rice was given a rare opportunity to work on Jerry Bruckheimer’s Remember the Titans. After working almost three months on the film, John returned to school and directed his studies toward learning the history of cinema. He moved to Los Angeles in January 2001 to pursue a career in film production. By mid 2001, John landed a position at the Los Angeles division of the German distribution company Senator International (which later became Mandate Pictures) lead by industry veteran Joseph Drake (Juno, The Grudge, Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle, 30 Days of Night, American Psycho). Under Joe’s mentoring, John developed an interest and dedication to producing feature films. John left Mandate in the fall of 2005 to form No Restrictions Entertainment LLC with filmmaker Edgar Michael Bravo. In 2008, John produced his first feature One Hour Fantasy Girl with Edgar Michael Bravo directing, Levi Obery co-producing.  In 2009, the team produced formed a new production entity, Bravo-Obery-Rice Productions, producing their second feature film now in post production, (psychological thriller) The Magic Stone, a journey into the mind of a homeless man who is trying to stay connected with reality as he struggles to protect a runaway boy and a girl he loves. John Paul Rice produced his third feature, Mother’s Red Dress, an unusual love story, last summer.

No Restrictions Entertainment on Twitter

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